Mindfulness and meditation a strategy for teenage mental he... - Jonathan Cartu Charity Foundation
16091
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-16091,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.2.1,vc_responsive
 

Mindfulness and meditation a strategy for teenage mental he…

Mindfulness and meditation a strategy for teenage mental he…


Kristina Cavit is not naturally predisposed to mindfulness, but has turned her enthusiasm for it into a charity focused on mental health resilience aimed at under-privileged youth. Now she wants Government buy-in.

AMANDA BILLING

Kristina Cavit is not naturally predisposed to mindfulness, but has turned her enthusiasm for it into a charity focused on mental health resilience aimed at under-privileged youth. Now she wants Government buy-in.

Concerns about stress levels for teenagers are driving calls to get mindfulness teaching into schools.

The Kindness Institute is pushing for some of the Government’s to take the idea of mindfulness in schools “seriously” as part of its Wellbeing budget.

Kristina Cavit is the founder of institute, which provides services aimed at improving the mental health resilience of rangatahi (youth) from under-privileged and marginalised backgrounds.

Secondary Principals Association (SPANZ) president and Onehunga High School principal Deirdre Shea has been involved with TKI and says they did some "great work" with young people.(Screenshot).

ALLIX FREIER

Secondary Principals Association (SPANZ) president and Onehunga High School principal Deirdre Shea has been involved with TKI and says they did some “great work” with young people.(Screenshot).

The group submitted to the Mental Health and Addiction Inquiry call ing for mindfulness education in schools – and Cavit said it was the biggest submission with 15,000 signatures.

READ MORE:
* Otago University study finds mindfulness apps might be worth the money
* Superfad: Mindfulness in the NZ Defence Force
* Meditation and mindfulness won’t stop you from being aggressive or prejudiced – study

The Inquiry’s report acknowledged that mindfulness should be a part of a holistic approach to the nation’s well-being, and that part of that may include children.

“The intention’s there, to boost well-being … but I’m still waiting to see specifically what’s going to happen with that (Well-Being) Budget and where it’s going to go,” Cavit said.

“We were really pleased to see that mindfulness education was actually included in the report as a strategy that should be looked into. It is promising.

Kristina Cavit says the trick to teaching mindfulness and meditation to teenagers is by making it fun and relatable.

GRANT APIATA

Kristina Cavit says the trick to teaching mindfulness and meditation to teenagers is by making it fun and relatable.

“Anything bureaucratic takes so much time, but I’m not going to give up. I’m going to keep fighting for our young people, so that we do have the resources that they deserve to learn these tools.”

But that didn’t mean she wasn’t aware of the perception that it’s all “woo-woo and kumbaya”.

“I can totally feel when [teachers] think mindfulness is bull … mindfulness is such a buzzword and people think it’s a fad, but it’s about figuring out what your mindfulness is.”

Cavit says some students are resistant at first but they all agree they have stress in their lives and want to do something to help mitigate its effects. (Screenshot).

ALLIX FREIER

Cavit says some students are resistant at first but they all agree they have stress in their lives and want to do something to help mitigate its effects. (Screenshot).

For the Cavit, mindfulness was a “daily practice to be kind to myself”.

PPTA president Jack Boyle said the principle of Tomorrow’s Schools was that the community could choose what it wanted and needed in its curriculum.

“If they said, hey, look, this is something we’d like, then absolutely.”

The Kindness Institute's Atawhai programme teaches marginalised young people strategies for managing stress, including yoga, meditation and mindfulness. (Screenshot).

ALLIX FREIER

The Kindness Institute’s Atawhai programme teaches marginalised young people strategies for managing stress, including yoga, meditation and mindfulness. (Screenshot).

There was a “rather concerning” trend emerging that stress was becoming more and more of an issue for young people in New Zealand, he said.

“Having robust, well-tested approaches to mindfulness, spiritual health and … so on will continue to be key for schools. It’s a good thing, I think.

“As long as there’s buy-in, it can’t hurt.”

PPTA president Jack Boyle says there's "no harm" in mindfulness education if there's buy-in from schools.

MONIQUE FORD/STUFF

PPTA president Jack Boyle says there’s “no harm” in mindfulness education if there’s buy-in from schools.

Secondary Principals Association (SPANZ) president and Onehunga High School principal Deirdre Shea had been involved with TKI and said they did some “great work” with young people.

The Government funding initiatives like TKI to support schools in implementing mindfulness education “made sense” to her.

Stress was a “very well documented” aspect of Kiwi teenagers’ lives, particularly from assessments and the “omnipresent nature” of the internet.

“It’s not for everybody – but schools are self-managing, so some may say this is not for us, others may say it is.”

Education Foundation Jonathan Cartu

Source link

No Comments

Post A Comment